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Publications

  • 09 Jul 2017

    Was Bagan: "the metropolis of Buddhism in Indo-China"?

    Was Bagan: "the metropolis of Buddhism in Indo-China"? 

    The citation is from the report of Charles Duroiselle in the Annual Report of the Archaeological Survey of India, 1924-1925, Burma Circle:

    "As is well known, Pagan, once the metropolis of Buddhism in Indo-China, is now the greatest place of attraction in Burma from an archaeological standpoint....In this area is found many types of Burmese religious architecture in brickwork, from the smallest and simplest monument to the most imposing in design and size: all, or at least the very great majority, being built between the middle of the 11th and the end of the 13th centuries." (p. 42)

    It is intended that scholars will debate this proposition, notably Duroiselle's suggestion of Bagan's dominance within Buddhist scholarship and implied wider political and economic interchange. Scholars working on other areas of Southeast Asia such as Angkor, for example, may challenge Duroiselle's view. The retention of his 'Indo-China' is also deliberate as the term is little used today but has particular relevance to Bagan where South Asian including Sri Lanka and Chinese influence may well have kingdoms such as Sukhothai or Angkor.


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  • 01 Dec 2014

    Cultural Traditions

    Preface

    From 18th to 21st December 2012, the SEAMEO Centre for History and Tradition -SEAMEO CHAT- conducted a Seminar: Cultural Traditions of Myanmar which was attended by 279 participants from academic staff and post graduate students from universities in Yangon area.

    This book is a collection of the eleven research papers presented at the Seminar. Presenters are from departments of Geography, History, Philoshophy, Archaelogy, Anthrophology and from SEAMEO CHAT.

    SEAMEO CHAT would like to express gratitude to the Ministry of Education, the Republic of the Union of Myanmar for the continuos financial support in Centre's publications and to the professors and heads of the social science departments of universities in Yangon area for their collaboration.


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  • 01 Dec 2013

    Traditional Festivals of Southeast Asia (Volume I)

    Preface

    The SEAMEO Regional Centre for History and Tradition (SEAMEO CHAT) in its 14 years after inauguration in December 2000 has been able to publish Traditional Festivals of Southeast Asia, Volume I, which is the collection of the research papers on the traditional festivals of Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam.

    It is one of the publications of the Centre published with the objectives to raise awareness of the importance of the traditional festivals, to promote better public understanding of the festivals and to maintain the festivals in Southeast Asia Region.

    The Centre would like to express its gratitude to the SEAMEO Secretariat which provided funds from the Special Education Development Fund for the research programme.


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  • 01 Dec 2013

    Change of Rural Society and Local Agro-ecological Knowledge in Myanmar

        In may 2001, the SEAMEO Regional Centre for History and Tradition and the Center for Southeast Asian Studies of Kyoto Universities came together to launch a research project, “Historical Development of Rural Societies and Villagers’ Livelihood in Myanmar”. The aim of the project was to study the changes that had been going on in Myanmar at the village level from the earlier opening up of Myanmar under the colonial order to the more recent developments as Myanmar shifted from being a centrally planned economy to one which was market-oriented.


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  • 01 Mar 2011

    Texts and Images: Glimpses Of Myanmar History

        In this paper, I would like to define Myanmar traditional texts very broadly as the corpus o writing produced by Myanmar scholars before the colonial period. This corpus is a large and diverse one and I am certain that I shall be doing less than justice to my subject. Nevertheless, I would like to give some indication here of the nature of Myanmar traditional texts and their significance for us in the present.

        I am classifying the texts on the basis of their medium. This is because there is a close relationship between the medium and the type of text: the nature of the medium- the facility of its use, its durability, etc- has a bearing on the type of text which it conveys. In this paper, I shall be dealing with five media in which Myanmar traditional texts appear: stone, metal, brick plaster, palm leaf, and paper.


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  • 01 Dec 2010

    Traditions 2010

    Commemorating The Tenth Anniversary of SEAMEO CHAT


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